Exploring New Growth Points in Mongolia

 

In March 2002, at the invitation of the Mongolian Ministry of Health, Albina du Boisrouvray and her team visited Mongolia to leverage FXB’s experience and develop a project aimed at preventing an HIV/AIDS epidemic. The FXB Mongolia Project was located in Selenge Aimag province, some 400 kilometers north of the capital, Ulaan Baatar. The pilot program initiated by FXB was successfully completed in 2007, and subsequent operations were passed on to the Mongolian Ministry of Health.

In 2015, FXB continued its poverty alleviation work in Mongolia, more specifically in Dornogobi aïmag in the Gobi desert region. Mongolia currently faces massive rural exodus, which is leading to overcrowding in the capital city.

The main goal of the FXBVillage Model is to empower 95 poor families in the rural areas of the Dornogobi with information concerning alternative opportunities for obtaining successful livelihoods at home and thus dissuading mass migration to the city of Ulaanbaatar, where more than half of the total Mongolian population currently lives.

 

How we helped

  • Nutrition
  • Health and Medical Support

Where we are working


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