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Turning Tragedy into Social Good: The Story of FXB

“My son, François, was passionate about rescuing people. As a helicopter pilot, it was his job – but also his life. When he died, I wanted to keep François’ passion alive – by promoting the things he cared about, and by rescuing orphans and people around the world from extreme poverty. And so, FXB was born, with the ultimate aim to bring about peace and security in the world by investing in children, young people and women.”

After more than 20 years in various creative fields, Countess Albina du Boisrouvray walked away from a successful career as a film producer and journalist. In 1989, she sold her assets and created FXB to honor her son François-Xavier Bagnoud’s commitment to serving others. Since then, we’ve been on the frontlines, creating sustainable solutions in eradicating poverty and lifting up children. Active in eight countries over the past 26 years, the FXBVillage model tackles the five main sources of poverty: food, health care, education, housing and income.

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Today, FXB is an international organization that has helped lift over 81,000 children and adults out of extreme poverty through a carefully calibrated methodology that focuses on creating lasting solutions.

What makes us different from the many international development agencies working around the world?

We’re not a charity.

Instead, FXB is an organization devoted to breaking the cycle of poverty and lifting up the discarded generation of children plagued by HIV/AIDS, war and poverty. Our goal is to help families in countries across the world become self-sufficient during a three-year program by simultaneously providing participants with health resources, social support and training. It’s an approach that’s worked for decades; 86 percent of FXBVillage families remain above the poverty line four years after the program ends. The FXBVillage model has also been recognized by both UNAIDS (2002) and UNICEF (2008) as a best practice approach for addressing challenges in developing nations.

In 1993, after launching in several countries such as Uganda, Rwanda and Colombia, the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights was created at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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